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The SNAP Team

Jonathan Osborne

Jonathan Osborne

Jonathan Osborne is the Kamalachari Family Professor of Science in the Graduate School of Education, Stanford University. He started his career teaching high school physics in inner London before joining King’s College London in 1985 where he worked for 23 years. He became a full professor in 2000 and Head of the Department of Education in 2005. He then joined Stanford in 2009. During his career, he has been an advisor to the UK House of Commons Science and Technology Committee for their report on Science Education in 2002, President of the US National Association for Research in Science Teaching (2006-7) and has won the association’s award for the best research publication in 2003 and 2004 in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching. He was a member of the US National Academies Panel that produced the new framework for the next generation standards in science in the US. Currently he is chair of the expert group responsible for producing the framework for the OECD PISA science assessments in 2015. His research focuses on the teaching and learning of argumentation, how to teach literacy in science, and students attitudes towards science.
Ray Pecheone

Raymond Pecheone

Ray Pecheone is currently a Professor of Practice in the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. Over the course of his career, Dr. Pecheone has been a leader in high stakes educational reform through assessment, research and policy work that has shaped district and state policies in curriculum and assessment by building broad-based grassroots support for strategic new approaches. Dr. Pecheone has had national impact in educational assessment through the development of nationally available assessments of teaching (edTPA) and student learning (Smarter Balanced Performance Assessment).
Helen Quinn

Helen Quinn

Helen R. Quinn is professor emerita of physics at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory at Stanford University. A theoretical physicist, she was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2003 and was president of the American Physical Society in 2004. In addition to her scholarship in physics, she has had long-term involvement in science education and in the continuing education of science teachers. She was an active contributor to the California State Science Standards development process. She recently chaired the Committee on a Conceptual Framework for New K-12 Science Education Standards for the National Research Council.

Jill Wertheim

Jill Wertheim is a Research Associate at SCALE. Dr. Wertheim has ten years of experience in research, development, and evaluation of earth science education curricula, assessments, standards, and programs. Her primary area of research is on how high-quality assessment can drive reform in earth science education. She began her work on using assessments to diagnose students' ideas about earth science topics in AAAS Project 20161, and expanded her areas of interest into geography while working at National Geographic. At SCALE, Dr. Wertheim has focused on examining how performance assessments can be used to measure students' reasoning with evidence and to model the vision of science learning from the Framework for K-12 Science Education. She holds a PhD in the Geological Sciences from University of California, Santa Barbara and a BA in Geology from Middlebury College.

Cathy Zozakiewcz

Cathy Zozakiewcz is the Project Manager for SNAP. Dr. Zozakiewicz spent 12 years on the faculty at San Diego State University, where her research spanned issues of multicultural education, gender equity and closing the achievement gap in science and math in elementary and middle school classrooms. She also collaborated with faculty, elementary teachers, and student teachers to create gender, culturally and linguistically inclusive practices to increase the number of underserved groups in STEM fields. Dr. Zozakiewicz became a Research Associate at SCALE in 2014. At SCALE, her work as focused on the development and implementation of teacher and student performance assessments including edTPA, a performance assessment for teacher education programs that is currently used for initial licensure of teachers in California, New York and a number of other states. She has also led numerous professional development workshops for teachers, teacher leaders and faculty on a variety of topics including effective mentoring, effective science teaching for culturally and linguistically diverse populations, academic language, designing performance assessments and implementing English Language and Literacy Integration into Science practices.

Past SNAP staff

Nicole Holthuis

Nicole Holthuis

Nicole Holthuis is a Research Associate at SCALE, with a focus on science education. She specializes in research, curriculum and assessment design, and evaluation in science and environmental education. Her work focuses on programs that seek to improve the educational experience and outcomes of students who are traditionally under-represented in science, engineering, math and technology. Dr. Holthuis has over 15 years of experience designing and evaluating curriculum, teaching, leading educator workshops, and providing solutions for teachers, schools, and institutions. She has directed and conducted both internal and external evaluations from small-scale/course-level to large-scale/nationally-funded studies. By combining state-of-the-art qualitative and quantitative methods, she provides a rigorous, robust, and holistic examination of instructional programs. Dr. Holthuis holds a PhD in Curriculum and Teacher Education and a MA in Design and Evaluation of Educational Programs, both from Stanford University. She also holds a BA in Biology from UC Davis and a California Secondary School Science Credential.
Susan Schultz

Susan Schultz

Susan Schultz is the Director of Teaching, Learning, and Assessment for SCALE. Her primary responsibilities involve designing and piloting science performance assessments in California, New York, and Ohio as well as developing a science teacher observation instrument to be used in the Measuring Effective Teaching (MET) study being funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. After earning her Ph.D. at Stanford in 1999, she was the Stanford Project Director for the Center for Assessment and Evaluation of Student Learning (CAESL), a NSF funded multi-university research project focusing on improving assessment development and classroom assessment strategies with the goal of improving student science achievement. As a Stanford Teacher Education Program (STEP) Instructor, she taught science curriculum, instruction, and assessment courses to teacher candidates emphasizing curriculum design, inquiry-based instruction, cooperative learning techniques, and alternative assessment strategies. Susan first partnered with SCALE as a member of the original Science Development Team for the Performance Assessment of California Teachers (PACT) and PACT Trainer working with universities across the state to pilot and score the PACT Assessment. She holds a B.S. degree in Biology and Chemistry at Elmira College, NY (1978); a M.A. in Education and California Secondary Science Teaching Credential at Stanford University (1986); and a Ph.D. in Curriculum and Teacher Education in Science Education at Stanford University (1999). Her teaching and research interests focus on science education, for pre-service as well as professional development for in-service teachers, with particular emphasis on issues of alternative assessments, inquiry-based learning, cooperative learning strategies, and equity. She is the author of cases in Groupwork in Diverse Classrooms: A Casebook for Educators and Using Assessments to Teach for Understanding: A Casebook for Educators as well as author of numerous journal articles on the reliability and validity of alternative assessment techniques (i.e., concept mapping and performance assessments).
Sara Dozier

Sara Dozier

Sara Dozier is a Ph.D. student in Curriculum and Teacher Education at Stanford University. She holds a Bachelor of Arts in Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology from the University of California, Santa Cruz and a Master of Science in Biological Science from the University of California, San Diego. Her research interests include how science teachers use information from both formative and summative assessment and describing the qualities of assessments that reflect the complexity of both the NGSS and student understanding. Sara worked as a biological researcher in both industry and academic labs for nearly a decade before transitioning to a career teaching high school science. She taught biology, chemistry, biotechnology, and project-based science electives in San Diego Unified and San Francisco Unified School Districts. She was the founding coordinator of the MedTech Academy, a California Partnership Academy emphasizing contextualized curriculum, student support structures, and relevance to the larger community. Most recently, Sara worked for three years as a science coordinator, providing instructional coaching and professional development for K-12 teachers of science, at the Alameda County Office of Education with the Science Partnership.
Quentin Sedlacek

Quentin Sedlacek

Quentin Sedlacek is a PhD candidate in Curriculum and Teacher Education at Stanford University. A native of Farina, Illinois, he holds a Bachelor of Arts in Physics from Harvard University and a Master of Arts in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of Mississippi, where he received the 2012 Mississippi Teacher Corps Award for Outstanding Academic Achievement. His work applies sociolinguistics and social psychology to teacher education, investigating ways in which teachers' understandings of language, race, and other socially constructed concepts can contribute to their adoption of new pedagogical tools. Quentin began his career as a high school mathematics teacher in American Samoa, where he served as a volunteer for the Cambridge-based nonprofit WorldTeach, Inc.; in the years that followed, he taught middle school math and high school science in the Mississippi Delta, where he also worked as an instructional coach and conducted pre-service and in-service teacher training.

K.C. Busch

K.C. Busch was a Post-Doctoral Fellow with the Stanford NGSS Assessment Project at Stanford Center for Assessment, Language & Equity. She holds a Ph.D. in science education from Stanford University as well as an M.A. from the University of Texas in Austin. After completing a B.S. in ecology from Iowa State University, she taught secondary school science in Austin, Texas for twelve years; she also has two years of informal environmental education experience in Africa with the Peace Corps and in Nevada with the National Park Service.

Preetha K. Menon

Preetha K. Menon received her Ph.D. in Education from the University of California, Santa Cruz in 2015. As part of the TEEL project in UCSC, Dr. Preetha Menon helped design and implement a set of classroom case studies to assess the impact of the use of ESTELL pedagogy by first year teachers on the achievement of the 3rdthrough 5th grade students. She also developed and maintained the database for the student achievement study which included teacher interviews, EDAISI observation data and scores on student assessments. Dr. Preetha K. Menon’s research interests include improving science learning using classroom-based assessments in linguistically diverse classrooms where the role of language plays a key role. Using mixed-methods approach her dissertation research examined the perspectives of both teachers and students on the potential of multimodal tasks to support science learning in linguistically diverse classrooms. With her experiences as a middle school science teacher she has a strong commitment to using theory and research to improve the science teaching and learning of the increasing diverse K-12 student population.

Paolo Martin

Paolo Martin is a Ph.D. candidate in Curriculum Studies and Teacher Education at the Graduate School of Education and an M.S. student in the Community Health and Prevention Research program at the Stanford School of Medicine. He earned his B.S. from UCLA in Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, and M.A.Ed from UC Berekley. He spent much of his career in education working with students who struggle in reading, organizing and conducting in-service teacher academies at UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Education and the Lawrence of Hall of Science, teaching pre-service literacy methods courses, and consulting for the California Postsecondary Education Commission part of the Improving Teacher Quality Initiative. His research interests center around the dynamics of classroom discourse practices, and how those dynamics affect the the instructional decision of teachers and the well-being and learning experiences of students, especially in the realm of digital technologies.